Invited Talks and Papers on Women and Minorities in Science

  1. “Being ‘The Only Woman in the Room’ 40 Years Ago – and What’s Changed” Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (May 2017)
  2. “What Can Be (and Is Being) Done to Increase Diversity?” Panel discussion, Equity in the Job Search: Tools for Navigating the (Hidden) Barriers Facing Women in STEM, Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (May 2017)
  3. “Equity and Inclusion in STEM: What’s Stopping Us?” Washington University in St. Louis (March 2017)
  4. “Black Holes and Physics” Women of Earth Science Symposium, Yale University (February 2017)
  5. “Equity and Inclusion in STEM: What’s Wrong and How Do We Change?” Understanding and Addressing STEM Inequalities Speaker Series, University of California, Merced (January 2017)
  6. “Why Physics Is Still a Boy’s Club and How to Change It” Invited Talk, Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics, Princeton University (January 2017)
  7. “Strategies for Reducing Unconscious Bias and Sexual Harassment” Invited Talk, Annual Conference on Gender/Equal Opportunities in Science, University of Copenhagen (December 2016)
  8. “Equity and Inclusion in STEM: How Do We Get There?” Annual Lecture, WISE Inspirations Network at Stanford (November 2016)
  9. “How to Build a More Excellent Department by Recruiting and Retaining Underrepresented Physicists” Physics Department, Stanford University (November 2016)
  10. “Breaking the Silence: A discussion on sexual harassment in science and how institutions can move forward” Panel Discussion, Learn Serve Lead 2016, Annual Meeting of the American Association of Medical Colleges, Seattle (November 2016)
  11. “How to Succeed as a Woman in Science” University of Cincinnati (October 2016)
  12. “STEM, Yale and Life” Keynote talk, Association of Yale Alumni Workshop on STEM CAREERS: Formulae and Solutions for Success (October 2016)
  13. “The Role of Scientific Societies in Establishing the Desired Climate and Culture in Science—Lessons from the front lines of change: the AAS experience” American Geophysical Union Workshop on Sexual Harassment in the Sciences: A Call to Respond, Washington DC (September 2016)
  14. “Making STEM Environments More Inclusive” Panel Discussion, NASA MissionSTEM Summit (August 2016)
  15. “Why So Few Women in Science?” Yale-National University of Singapore (August 2016)
  16. “Why We Must Worry About Harassment” Interactive Lecture, Annual Empowering Women in Science and Engineering Symposium, Cornell University (May 2016)
  17. “Do You Have to be a Genius to be an Astrophysicist?” Annual WiSETI/Schlumberger Lecture, Women in Science, Engineering and Technology Initiative, Cambridge University (March 2016)
  18. “Vera Rubin: Bringing the Dark to Light” Remarks at the premiere, Fiske Planetarium, University of Colorado at Boulder (January 2016)
  19. “Challenges and Benefits of Equity and Inclusion for Academic Success” University of Colorado at Boulder (January 2016)
  20. “Why Physics Is Still a Boys’ Club—And how to change it” Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics, Georgia Tech (January 2016)
  21. “Forward Focused Ethics – What is the Role of Scientific Societies in Responding to Harassment and Other Workplace Climate Issues?” Panel at the American Geophysical Union Annual Conference, San Francisco (December 2015)
  22. “Science and gender: Scientists must work harder on equality” C. M. Urry, Nature, 528, 471-473 (December 2015)
  23. “Why Physics Is Still A Boys’ Club – and how to change it” Physics Colloquium, Aarhus University, and keynote talk for Kvinder i Fysik (Women in Physics) Annual Meeting (November 2015)
  24. “My Journey through the Cosmos: Taking on supermassive black holes and the invisible barriers facing women in science” Invited Speaker for Yale Scientific, Yale University (November 2015)
  25. “Implicit Bias and Gender in Astronomy” Space Telescope Science Institute, Caroline Herschel Discussions (October 2015)
  26. “How to End Sexual Harassment in Astronomy: The case against Geoff Marcy must be a wake-up call to reform our field” Scientific American (October 2015)
  27. “A (U.S.) Woman’s View of Astronomy at Age 30, 40, 50 and nearly 60” Women in Astronomy Workshop, Brisbane (July 2015)
  28. “Women in a Man’s World: Why It Matters and How to Succeed” Ewha Women’s University, Seoul (June-July 2015)
  29. Panelist, “Sexism, Science and Science Writing: Promoting Women Leaders in the Lab and Newsroom” Harvard Kennedy School (April 2015)
  30. “Why So Few? The Dearth of Women in Science” College of Natural Sciences, University of Texas, Austin (December 2014)
  31. “Hidden Gender Bias Still Influences Physics Field” Fermi Today, August 2014 issue, p. 1
  32. “Women in Physics and Astronomy – Why So Few? And How to Get to Parity,” Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (July 2014)
  33. “How Workplace Climate Changes the Knowledge We Generate” STATUS, June 2014 issue, p. 12-15 (June 2014)
  34. “Black Holes, Galaxies and the Evolution of the Universe: An Observer’s View” Russell Women in Science Lecture, Mills College (April 2014)
  35. “Women in Science: Why So Few (and How to Move Toward Normal)” Mills College (April 2014)
  36. “How Workplace Climate Changes the Knowledge We Generate” Keynote address, University of California Office of the President ADVANCE Roundtable, UC Davis (April 2014)
  37. “Women in Science” ETH Zurich (April 2014)
  38. “Women in Science: Why So Few?” University of Zurich (April 2014)
  39. “Unconscious Bias - Current Status and the Way Forward” Panel on Women in Physics and Astronomy: Past, Present, and Future, Iowa State University (February 2014)
  40. “Understanding Black Holes and Active Galaxies” Public Lecture, Women in STEM Series, Iowa State University (February 2014)
  41. “Why We Resist Unconscious Bias” STATUS, January 2014 issue, p. 10 (2014)
  42. “Why So Few? The Dearth of Women in Physics and Astronomy” University of California at San Diego (October 2013)
  43. “Why So Few? The Dearth of Women in Physics and Astronomy” 6thAnnual Fall Luncheon, Graduate Women in Science and Engineering, Boston University (October 2013)
  44. “Raising the Bar in Physics Graduate Education” STATUS, p. 1 (June 2013)
  45. “Raising the Bar in Physics Graduate Education”APS Newletter “Back Page” (May 2013)
  46. “Raising the Bar in Physics Graduate Education” Keynote Address, American Physical Society Conference on Graduate Education (February 2013)
  47. “Black Holes, Galaxies, and Cosmic Evolution” Keynote address, Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics, Colorado School of Mines (January 2013)
  48. “The Cosmic Growth of Black Holes & Why There Are Too Few Women in Science“ University of Denver (January 2013)
  49. “Women in Physics: Why So Few?” Drexel University (November 2012)
  50. “Women in Science” STEM Panel, Fifth Annual Women’s Leadership Initiative Conference, Yale University (November 2012)
  51. “Why Are We Biased Against Women In Science?” CNN.com (October 2012)
  52. “Thank You, Sally Ride” CNN.com (July 2012)
  53. “Women in Science: Why So Few?” University of Chicago (January 2012)
  54. “Women in Science: Why So Few?” Northeast Regional Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics, Yale University (January 2012)
  55. “The James Webb Space Telescope” Women in Aerospace, Capitol Hill (December 2011)
  56. “Women in Science: Why So Few?” Distinguished Women Scholars Seminar, University of Maryland (October 2011)
  57. “Girls and the Future of Science” Huffington Post (July 2011)
  58. “The Fourth International Conference on Women in Physics” STATUS, p. 5-11 (June 2011)
  59. “Physics Chairs at Harvard and Yale” (with Melissa Franklin), National Symposium for the Advancement of Women in Science, Harvard University (February 2011)
  60. “Supermassive Black Hole Growth and Galaxy Evolution” ADVANCE Distinguished Women Scholars Lecture, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona (January 2011)
  61. “Women in Science” 3rd Annual Yale Women’s Leadership Initiative Conference (November 2010)
  62. “Women in Science – Why So Few?” Women in Math and Science, Ohio State University (November 2010)
  63. “Women in Space Science” Keynote address, Adler Planetarium, Chicago (May 2010)
  64. “Women in Science – Why So Few?” WISELI/WOWSA Invited Speaker, University of Wisconsin (May 2010)
  65. “Women in Science – Why So Few?” American Association of University Women, Guilford CT (January 2010)
  66. “Women in Science – Why So Few?” Yale University Women’s Organization (December 2009)
  67. “Women in Science – Why So Few?” Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University (September 2009)
  68. “Women in (European) Astronomy” Invited talk, Joint European National Astronomy Meeting, Vienna (September 2009) Published in Reviews Modern Astronomy, vol. 21, P. 249 (2009)
  69. “Women in Science” Westover Academy Centennial (April 2009)
  70. “Falling Into a Black Hole” Women and Science Distinguished Speaker Series University of North Carolina, (March 2009)
  71. “Women in Physics - Why So Few?” National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University (March 2009)
  72. “Why I’m Talking to You at NSAWS: What I learned over 30 years as a woman in science” National Symposium on the Advancement of Women in Science, Harvard University (February 2009)
  73. “Women in Physics: Why Aren’t There More of Us?” National Keynote address, Regional Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics (January 2009)
  74. “In Praise of Daycare” STATUS, January 2009 issue, p. 8 (2009)
  75. “A Report from the Gender Equity Conference for Physics” AAPT/APS Physics Department Chairs’ Conference (June 2008)
  76. “Closing the Gender Gap” Brookhaven RHIC/AGS User’s Meeting Forum on Women in Physics (May 2008)
  77. “Keeping Women in Physics” American Physical Society (April 2008)
  78. “In Search of Supermassive Black Holes” Keynote address, 3rd Nordic Women in Physics Workshop, Copenhagen (August 2007)
  79. “Affecting the Climate for Women in Physics: The CSWP Site Visit Program” STATUS, June 2007 issue, p. 13 (2007)
  80. “A Supermassive Black Hole at the Heart of Every Galaxy” Distinguished Speaker Series University of Maryland Baltimore County ADVANCE (September 2006)
  81. “Why So Few Women in Science?” American Women in Science Meeting, Washington DC (April 2006)
  82. “Hidden Black Holes — and Where are the Rest of ‘Me’?” Goddard Space Flight Center (January 2006)
  83. “The Sky’s Not the Limit: Women in Astronomy” Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University (November 2005)
  84. “Why So Few Women in Science? The Myth of ‘Innate Differences’” Cornell University (October 2005)
  85. “Women in Science: Speeding up the Long, Slow Path to Change” Haverford College (October 2005)
  86. “Photons Have No Gender: A Woman’s View of Physics” Invited talk, Gendered Innovations in Science and Engineering, Stanford University (April 2005), written version in Gendered Innovations in Science and Engineering, ed. L. Schiebinger (Stanford University Press), p. 150 (2005)
  87. “Women in Science” National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (May 2005)
  88. “Women in Science” University of Minnesota (April 2005)
  89. “Discussion of Women in Science” National Public Radio Science Friday (January 28, 2005)
  90. “Women in Astronomy” University of Texas (March 2004)
  91. “Women in Science: Speeding up the Long, Slow Path to Change” University of Washington, Lecture Series on Issues for Ethnic Minorities and Women in Science and Engineering (February 2004)
  92. “Summary of Women in Astronomy II Conference Part 2. Where Do We Go From Here?” 2003, American Astronomical Society Newsletter, #118, p. 10 (December 2003)
  93. “Summary of Women in Astronomy II Conference Part 1. Where Do We Stand?” 2003, American Astronomical Society Newsletter, #117, p. 6 (October 2003)
  94. “Toward Equality: Challenges and Strategies” National Symposium on the Advancement of Women in Science, Harvard University (April 2003)
  95. “Women in Physics” University of Maryland (March 2003)
  96. The Status of Women in Physics – An International Meeting on What, Why, and How to Change” Forum on Physics and Society of the American Physical Society, Vol. 31, No. 3 (July 2002)
  97. “Physics: For Women, the Last Frontier” S. Tobias, and A. Venkatesan, Science, 296, 1201 (2002)
  98. “National Culture and Women in Physics: Liberté, egalite, ‘Sororité’ “ S. Stephenson and Radiations, Vol. 8, Issue 2, p. 5–7 (2002)
  99. “IUPAP Conference Highlights” Radiations, Vol. 8, Issue 2, p. 8 (2002)
  100. “The Persistent Dearth of Women in the Physical Sciences” BAPS, APR02, #E7, 001 (2002)
  101. “Speeding up the Long Slow Path to Change” CSWP Gazette, Vol. 21, No. 2, p. 1 (2002)
  102. “IUPAP Chair’s Report” BAPS, MAR02, #Q5, 001 (2002)
  103. “The IUPAP Conference on Women in Physics” American Astronomical Society (June 2002)
  104. “The IUPAP Conference on Women in Physics” US National Committee of the IUPAP (June 2002)
  105. “Women Faculty: Improving the ‘Chilly Climate’ “APS Physics Chairs’ Conference (June 2002)
  106. “The IUPAP Conference on Women in Physics” American Physical Society (April 2002)
  107. “The Persistent Dearth of Women in the Physical Sciences” American Physical Society (April 2002)
  108. “The Culture of Physics – Can There be Space for Women?” Yale University Women’s Center (April 2002)
  109. “Gender and Science” Women Faculty Forum, Yale University, December (2001)
  110. “Women in Astronomy: Past, Present, and Future” Canadian Astronomical Society Graduate Student Symposium, McMaster University (May 2001)
  111. “Women in Astronomy: Statistics, Reasons, and the Future” The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (March 2001)
  112. “The Status of Women in Astronomy” STATUS, p. 6 (June 2000)
  113. “The Demographics of Women in Astronomy” K. B. Marvel, and B. Blacker, BAAS 31, #121, 01 (June 2000)
  114. “The Gendered Mind: Women in Math, Engineering, Physics, Astronomy, and Computer Science” National Symposium on the Advancement of Women in Science, Harvard University (April 2000)
  115. “Women in Astronomy Today” American Physical Society, Atlanta (April 2000)
  116. “Giving a Talk and Getting a Job” Space Telescope Science Institute (December 1999)
  117. “Women in Astronomy – The Latest Statistics” Harvard Center for Astrophysics (October 1999)
  118. “Women in Science” University of Pennsylvania (September 1999)
  119. “The Baltimore Charter and Women in Astronomy” STATUS, p. 6 (June 1999)
  120. “My Career as a Woman Astronomer” Towson State University (May 1999)
  121. “The Baltimore Charter and its Impact” Centennial Meeting of the American Physical Society, Atlanta (March 1999)
  122. “Behind the Scenes, Behind the Screens” (with Lisa Frattare) STATUS, p. 15 (January 1999)
  123. “The Status of STATUS” (with Lisa Frattare) STATUS, p. 1 (January 1999)
  124. “The Demographics of Women in Astronomy” American Astronomical Society, Atlanta (January 1999)
  125. “Women in Physics and Astronomy” The Johns Hopkins University (March 1998)
  126. “Women in Astronomy” Pennsylvania State University (December 1997)
  127. “Highlights from the Hubble Space Telescope” Annual Hypatia Society Dinner, College of Notre Dame (May 1997)
  128. “Women in Science” American River College, Sacramento (November 1994)
  129. “The Baltimore Charter for Women in Astronomy” Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society (October 1994)
  130. “The Baltimore Charter for Women in Astronomy” CSWP Gazette, Vol. 13, p. 14 (1993)
  131. “The Baltimore Charter for Women in Astronomy” Harvard Center for Astrophysics (April 1994)
  132. “Women in Astronomy” Australian National University (June 1993)
  133. “Introduction to the Women in Astronomy Meeting” in Women in Astronomy, ed. L. Danly, L. E. Sherbert, and S. Gonzaga (STScI), p. 5 (1993)
  134. “Preface” in Women in Astronomy, ed., L. Danly, L. E. Sherbert, and S.Gonzaga (STScI), p. i (1993)
  135. Women in Astronomy, ed. L. Danly, L. E. Sherbert, and S. Gonzaga (STScI), (1993)
  136. “The Baltimore Charter for Women in Astronomy” L. Danly, E. J. Schreier, and S. Tobias, BAAS 25, 182, #65, 01 (1993)
  137. “The STScI Workshop on Women in Astronomy” Space Telescope Science Institute (September 1992)